Plants For Wounded Heroes

I’m no Green Thumb. I lack the necessary patience, though I do enjoy having natives in the garden to attract birds, bees and bandicoots. Hailing from parents who lived through the Depression I also enjoy produce from my fruit and vegetable gardens. Little effort required and the pumpkin vines are currently taking over the tiny back lawn.

On the iconic quarter acre block that I grew up on, the so-called Australian Dream, (long since battle-axed for the prolific development of McMansions) we grew all our own Veges as well as having the backyard chook shed for eggs and a couple of additions to the table at Christmas. Chicken in the Basket was a family favourite, though after having just read Tom Clancy’s The Teeth Of The Tiger, I don’t think I’ll ever think about that meal in the same way.

The parental vegetable garden was a staple right until the end. Indeed, my father’s casket was covered with home grown spinach and tomatoes which I cooked up at the wake with garlic and pasta complementing the depletion of the contents of the wine cellar.

Since my retirement I’ve taken cuttings of plants which I have nurtured and then sold at a local market on a semi regular basis. Preloved books also find new homes and I am lucky in that several friends donate saleable items. This is my form of aerobics : stretching, bending, reaching (some groaning) and Vitamin D.

Rosemary plants are popular sellers

All monies raised go to Wounded Heroes which assists our exservice men and women at a grassroots level. This non Government funded organisation finds crisis accomodation for our vets, funds accomodation and fuel for medical appointments, and assists with real hardship cases. Recently, an exserviceman with a young family was diagnosed with his third bout of cancer. Wounded Heroes came to the fore with funds to assist with travel costs and parking fees. The day after Anzac Day a young exserviceman committed suicide. The Government covered the funeral cost, but it was Wounded Heroes that paid for the casket to be transported 1000 kms away to his home town. With a volunteer escort. Respect.

Succulents also sell well

So I play in my garden and sell a few plants. Sadly, I am unable to replicate the beautiful Bat Plants despite numerous attempts. This is a real shame as I always wanted to be called Bat Woman. Even had a little leather number on the drawing board.

NOTE:

I am not responsible for any actions which may occur when someone tells me “ there is nothing to do”.

5 thoughts on “Plants For Wounded Heroes

  1. wiseassvegan

    You found such an honorable and kind way to give back to and acknowledge those who have risked their lives for the safety of others. Love your end note too; there is always something that can be done, when you have the will to do.

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  2. One of your pictures is all succulents. We grow those as well because they are drought resistant. As for veggies…it may not be long before that is the way we all have to feed ourselves.

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    1. Earthspins, Queensland is stinking hot and humid in summer. It used to be that this was also when we received our rainfall, but not so these past few years. It either floods or nothing. Thus the prevalence of succulents. They bore me senseless but are practical. I have lemon, lime, passion fruit, pineapple, tomatoes, peas, pumpkins, chillies and cabbages growing on my 400sqare metre block which is tiny. I’m refusing to buy fruit and veg from overseas, and want veges that have some taste. It’s not difficult to use shower water on the vege garden in summer. Give it a go – it’s rewarding:)

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